Medical Info

Visits – Vaccines – Screenings

Kids’ Health Partners follows the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics for routine preventive health visits and recommended vaccinations. We feel that the safety and effectiveness of current vaccines is strongly supported by current research. The following is our recommended schedule for immunizations and checkups.

Recommended schedule for immunizations and checkups

  • 2-3 days: weight and health check
  • 1 month: checkup, hepatitis B vaccine, maternal postpartum depression screening
  • 2 month: checkup, DTaP/HiB/Polio combination, Prevnar, Rotavirus vaccines
  • 4 month: checkup, DTaP/HiB/Polio combination, Prevnar, Rotavirus vaccines
  • 6 month: checkup, DtaP/HiB/Polio combination, Prevnar, Rotavirus vaccines
  • 9 month: checkup, hepatitis B vaccine, lead poisoning risk assessment, anemia screening, formal development assessment
  • 1 year: checkup, MMR, chickenpox and Hepatitis A vaccines, vision screening
  • 15 month: checkup, DTaP, HiB, Prevnar vaccines (some may be deferred until 18 month visit)
  • 18 month: checkup, hepatitis A vaccine, any vaccines deferred from 15 month visit, formal development assessment
  • 2 years: checkup, formal development assessment, vision screening, any vaccines deferred from 18 month visit
  • 2-1/2 years: checkup, formal development assessment
  • 3 years: checkup, vision screening
  • 4 years: checkup, DTaP/Polio combination, MMR, chickenpox vaccines (some/all may be deferred to 5 year visit), vision and hearing screening
  • 5 years: checkup, any vaccines deferred from 4 year visit
  • 6-10 years: annual checkup
  • 10 years: checkup, TdaP vaccine
  • 11 years: checkup, meningitis and HPV vaccines
  • 12-16 years: checkup, complete HPV series
  • 17 years: checkup, meningitis vaccine
  • 18 years – school completion: annual checkup (cholesterol screening at least once during this period)

Fever Information

Fever is a very common symptom in children. It is part of your child’s normal response to infections. Fever is defined as axillary (under the arm) temperature of 100.5°F. Oral (mouth) and rectal temperatures are generally a bit higher than axillary temperature. We recommend that you use a digital thermometer, and measure the temperature under the arm or orally first. Rectal temperature is the most accurate method for infants less than two months old. Ear (otic) thermometers are expensive and often inaccurate, so we do not recommend them.

If your child is under 2 months old and has a fever you should call the office or the doctor on call immediately. 

Click here to read, download, and/or print information on fever in children, including recommended fever medicine dosages.

Click here to read about dosing for Tylenol and Motrin.

Benadryl Dosage Information

If your child is under the age of 2 please call our office before giving Benadryl.

View Benadryl Dosing


Benadryl should not be given more often than every 6 hours.

Breastfeeding

Click here for breastfeeding information from La Leche League International.

Asthma/Allergies

Do you have questions about using an inhaler? Click here to download recommendations for how to properly use an asthma inhaler.

Click here for information on asthma and common allergies from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Patient Education Videos

Car Seat Safety

Click here for current car seat safety recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Food Allergies

Click here to learn more about children’s food allergies from The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network.

Dentistry

Click here for resources and tips for children’s dentistry from The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

Summer Safety

Click here for summer safety tips for children playing outdoors from HealthyChildren.org.

Click here for children’s summer sun and water safety information from HealthyChildren.org.

Ticks

Click here to find out more about ticks from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lice

Click here to find out more about lice from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Teen Substance Use

Click here to learn more about vaping from the Surgeon General.

Click here to learn more about marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Click here to learn more about teens and drinking from Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Our Doctors’ Favorite Books

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